BEAUTY AND BUTCHERY - St Paul’s to Smithfield
The beauty – the newly cleaned West front of St Paul’s Cathedral, the restored Wren Temple Bar, returned to London after 250 years, and the 12c. St Bartholomew the Great (entry charges). The butchery – stories of executions, early surgery and meat markets.

THE BLITZ AND ITS EFFECT ON THE 21ST C. CITY
A walk concentrating on the events, characters, and human stories of the terrifying months of the winter of 1940/41. These events will also be put contemporary context by showing how the effect of the Blitz is still influencing London today.  Walk ends on a new viewing gallery with a spectacular view over St Paul’s and the City.

CITY CHURCHES (Interiors – weekdays only)
The glory of the City of London – over 38 churches in a stone’s throw of each other, the many designed by Christopher Wren, some by Nicholas Hawksmoor, a few surviving the Great Fire of London.  Walk eminently flexible it can either concentrate on interiors visiting up to 4 churches, concentrate on just Wren churches, or can pass more churches by seeing exterior only (latter can be done at weekends). Half or full day options available with lunch in City pub.

DEATH IN THE SHADOW OF THE TOWER – Executions, Fire and Plague
A walk round the outside of Tower of London, through the narrow alley-ways of the City, ending at the Monument, which can be climbed for a great view of the City (entry charge). To entertain children + adults alike.

FLEET STREET – FROM PAMPHLETS TO PRESS BARONS
One of London’s oldest thoroughfares, still retaining its narrow alley-ways and courtyards. Fleet St. has been the home of the printed word for over 500 years. Samuel Pepys and Dr. Johnson feature as well as the press barons of the 20c. Could be combined weekdays with a visit to Dr. Johnson’s House (entry charges).

THE GENIUS OF SIR CHRISTOPHER WREN
Wren ‘built for eternity’, but was by profession an astronomer and experimental scientist. A walk that explores his life and genius through his buildings. From Monument, via many churches to St Paul’s. Half or full day options (with lunch in City pub).

HIDDEN GARDENS OF THE CITY (Walk 1)
A walk concentrating on the area in the West of the City most devastated by the Blitz.  After the war many gardens were created.  This walk concentrates on those gardens between Barbican and St. Paul’s.  Whilst concentrating on the gardens it is a way of tracing the varied history of the City from a different perspective…literally!  (Best between March to October).

HIDDEN GARDENS OF THE CITY AND RIVERSIDE (Walk 2)
An additional walk of the gardens of the City, concentrating on the St. Paul’s area and the riverside, ending in a ruined church in the East of the City now converted into a ‘secret’ garden.

FIRE AND PLAGUE THROUGH THE EYES OF SAMUEL PEPYS
Tracing Pepys’ colourful life and his observations on high and low life in London during the Plague, Great Fire and the regeneration of the city. It weaves through the narrow alley-ways of the City along routes that Pepys would have known.

MONEY, MONEY, MONEY – HISTORY OF  MONEY-MAKING IN THE CITY
A walk that traces  2000 years of money making, from the Romans, through the medieval livery companies, 18c.coffee houses, the establishment of the Bank of England, and Stock Exchange to the 21c. world financial powerhouse.

NEW BUILDINGS OF THE CITY – The Post-Brexit Effect
In its 2000yr. history the City has faced many cataclysmic events, the Great Fire and Blitz, end of Empire and ‘Big Bang’, and each time it has risen metaphorically and literally ‘from the ashes’.  Now comes the challenge of Brexit.   In response the City has developed a new strategy which is reflected (yes double meaning intended!) in its new buildings.  Get a real flavour of the City rising to the challenge of the next phase in its history (2 ½ hrs +).

FROM RAGSTONE TO RICHES – What’s London built of?
A walk from Clerkenwell into the City, concentrating on the building materials of London, from the Kentish ragstone of the Roman Wall to the glistening steel and glass of 21st century London. Spot a few fossils on the way!

ROMAN LONDON
A walk right across Roman London from fragments of the wall near the Tower, to the North West corner – site of the roman fort.  This walk gives an idea of the scale, layout and everyday life of the first 400 years of London, visiting the key sites such as the Governor’s Palace, the Forum, the Fort, and the remains of the city wall (2 ½ hrs).

ROMAN MONUMENTS UNDER LONDON Tour of Roman Amphitheatre and recently restored Temple of Mithras
Starts near the ruins of the Roman wall and includes a guided tour of the Roman Amphitheatre under Guild Hall Art Gallery. A short walk away is the recently restored Temple of Mithras, originally found in 1950s but now relocated by Bloomberg’s to its original location 7 metres below street level under their new headquarters.  It is housed in an impressive mini museum with displays of some of the 14,000 artefacts discovered during construction.

ROMAN WALL WALK
The 21c. ‘Square Mile’ London’s financial centre is still essentially contained within the bounds of the Roman Wall, of which some fragments remain. This walk traces the route of the wall.. On the way one passes many layers of London’s history (3 ½ – 4hrs). Full day if done with guided tour of Roman Galleries + lunch at Museum of London.

SKYSCRAPERS  OF THE CITY AND RIVERSIDE – FROM THE ‘CHEESE-GRATER ’ TO THE SHARD
A walk concentrating on the new skyscrapers changing the skyline of the City.  Starting at what the planners call the ‘Eastern Cluster’ around Bishopsgate, the walk explores the modern architecture of the Eastern area of the City, crossing Tower Bridge to end under the Shard.

TEA AND COFFEE – How they made the City rich
Coffee and tea first arrived in London in the mid 17c, and from then on have been central to the growth of London as a great financial and trading centre. This walk weaves through the City of London, crosses London Bridge and ends in Southwark tracing this history and can end with a cup of tea or coffee.

THE WALBROOK (3hrs)
It is the shortest but arguably the most important of London’s ‘Lost Rivers’, as it formed the heart of Roman ‘Londinium’.  A walk of great contrast between the vibrant, youthful area of Shoreditch and the serious money-making pulse of the City. It passes Shakespeare’s original playhouse, foundations of which have been recently discovered and the location of 2 major archaeological digs, Liverpool St. Crossrail and the Walbrook. These are shedding new light on London’s history.

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